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Marshall James Nev, PLC | Glossary of Headache-related Terms in Richmond

Lexington-Richmond Headache Clinic
Marshall James Ney, DMD, FAAOP
Fellow American Academy of Oral Facial Pain

527 W. Main St.
Richmond, 40475
(859) 623-3761

Glossary of Headache-related Terms
 

Acute

Of recent origin, usually less than three months

Botox

This is a toxin which is used to paralyze muscle for about 3 months. It has its good and bad sides. You can read about Botox for Pain to understand more.

Bruxism

Grinding of teeth

Centric Occlusion

Teeth meshed together

Centric Relation

Jaw Joints in the socket

Cervical

Anything dealing with the neck

Chronic

Long standing; usually over three months. Does not mean incurable.

Clench

To hold teeth tightly together without moving them.

Condyle

Headache1.jpg

The head of the lower jaw or mandible that fits into the socket (part of the tempromandipular Joint, TMJ).

Fossa

Is the socket of a joint.

Latent Trigger Point

A trigger point which is not causing pain but will if something aggravates it.

Ligament

Restricts the movement of a joint

Malocclusion

A bite that causes problems with muscles, joints, teeth gums, or bone.

Pain Management

This term is used nowadays for a clinic that manages patients that take Rx pain pills daily.

Mandible

Lower jaw.

Masticatory System

The chewing system that includes teeth, gums, bones, ligaments, and muscles.

Maxilla

Upper jaw.

Muscles of Mastication

Headache2.jpg

Muscle Spasm

Believe it or not, this is a rare problem. What we usually see is muscle tension. However, in a true muscle spasm, the muscle will stick out and be obviously flexed.

Occlusion

This is your bite — the way your teeth fit together.

Rebound Headache

This is a headache brought on by using too many short acting pain pills such as Tylenol, Ibuproffen, and Aspirin.

Reduce

Headache3.pngTo put a joint back into its proper position; as in when the cartilage is in front of the mandibular condyle and needs to be moved back to its functionally correct position

Range of Motion (ROM)

How far you can turn a joint; usually measured in degrees or millimeters. For example, you can typically rotate your head to the left 80 degrees.

Referred Pain

Headache4.jpg

Pain felt at a distant site from the source of the pain. In the illustration, X is the trigger point, and the red is where the pain is felt.

Refined Carbohydrates

Sugar

Sleep Stage 1

High brain and muscle activity

Sleep Stage 2

50% of your night is spent in this stage of sleep. Lower brain activity and lower muscle activity sleep.

Sleep Stages 3 and 4

Much lower brain and muscle activity. This stage is a very important part o sleep.

Sudden Onset Headache

This is a headache that occurs unexpectedly, where the patient does not have a history of headaches.

REM Sleep

Stage of sleep in which the brain is very active but the muscles are paralyzed.

Splint

An acrylic oral appliance designed to give one a near perfect bite.

TMD

TMD is a syndrome and includes the symptoms common to the syndrome. These may include headache, neck pain, tender muscles, and sleep disorders.

TMJ

Headache5.jpg

This is the jaw joint (not the TMD syndrome). The TMJ is located in front of the ear.

Trigger Point

A point of irritable muscle tissue, which is especially tender to squeezing and refers pain to a distant site.
Headache6.jpg
Cross-sectional schematic drawing of flat palpation to localize and hold the trigger point (dark red spot) for injection. (A, B) Use of alternating pressure between two fingers to confirm the location of the palpable nodule of the trigger point. (C) Positioning of the trigger point halfway between the fingers to keep it from sliding to one side during the injection. Injection is away from fingers, which have pinned down the trigger point so that it cannot slide away from the needle. A Dotted outline indicates additional probing to explore for additional adjacent.

 

 
 
Richmond Dentist | Glossary of Headache-related Terms. Marshall James Ney is a Richmond Dentist.